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Cordell Hull Lake Youth Deer Hunt helps manage deer population on public land

The following article was submitted by a representative from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. To see the article on the USACE website, click here

Eli and Randy Randolph don blaze orange, a crossbow, and backpack of gear as they hike to their staked-out hunting location in Carthage, Tenn., Dec. 1, 2018. (USACE photo by Ashley Webster)

CARTHAGE, Tenn. – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District staff at Cordell Hull Lake held the project’s annual Youth Deer Hunt on Dec. 1 – 2, 2018, at Defeated Creek and Tailwater Recreation Areas.

“The youth deer management hunt derived from the overpopulation of white tailed deer in our two recreation areas,” said Park Ranger Kenny Claywell, biologist at the lake.  “As a result of the large concentration of deer, we looked at ways to better manage the deer herd.”

Defeated Creek Recreation area alone receives over 100,000 visitors a year. The high population of deer, mixed with the number of vehicles traveling the single road entrance has produced an occasional issue over the years.  The ranger staff has witnessed up to 50 different deer during patrols of Defeated Creek Recreation Area.

Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency has been a founding partner since the organized hunt began in 2010.  Every year, Smith County Wildlife Enforcement Officer Bob Lowery speaks to the group three weeks prior to the hunt where he provides safety instructions, confirms mentor and youth hunter education certificates, and explains how the hunting efforts fall within wildlife and resource management.

The Corps of Engineers organize the required prehunt meeting to assign the kids to their hunting locations, review safety measures, and explain the logistics for the two-hunting days.

The 10 youth hunters, ages 10 to 16, and their mentors stepped onto public land as early as 5 a.m.  Despite the official sunrise taking place at 6:36 a.m., early entry allowed the youth and their mentors to get acclimated to the dark and allow the area to be quiet before sunrise.

The first shot rang out at approximately 6:30 a.m. on the first day of hunting and led to a single doe being harvested by Anna Gatlin.

“Today we were able to get a deer within 30 minutes and was definitely worth attending,” Gatlin said. “Usually a hunter would have to enter the woods well in advance.  Then we would have to be really patient and wait a couple of hours.”

The Cordell Hull Resource Management Office provided lunch, which gave hunters the opportunity to dry off from the wet weather and build relationships with peers who share the same love for the great outdoors and hunting.  A local hunting club affiliated with Smith County High School, Timberloft restaurant, and Walmart sponsored the food.  Randall Smith, advisor of the Smith County Hunting Club, prepared the food for the participants.

“The organized hunt is great for young hunters to get out and get used to the experience of hunting.  When they get older, they are going to take their kids, and hopefully remember this event,” Gatlin said.

Every participant left the two-day hunt with a token to commemorate their stewardship efforts with the overpopulation of deer.  Some contributing partnerships locally and from surrounding counties were Smith County Hardware, Wildwood Resort and Marina, French’s Shoes, and Outdoor Junction.  Claywell thanks all the sponsors and their contributions.  Without their support this event may not be as impacting and memorable for the youth and mentors.

“The hunt not only stewards a love for the great outdoors, but also offers a great occasion for the hunters and their mentors to spend the day together,” said Mark Herd, Cordell Hull Lake Natural Resource manager.  “The hunters made an impact to next season’s population.  The eight deer harvested this weekend could have birthed up to fourteen offspring depending on their maturity.”

Next year’s hunt is tentatively scheduled for the first weekend in December.  For more information follow us at www.facebook.com/cordellhulllake or contact the Cordell Hull Lake Natural Resource Management office at 615-735-1034.

The public can obtain news, updates and information from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District on the district’s website at http://www.lrn.usace.army.mil, on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/nashvillecorps, http://www.facebook.com/cordellhulllake, and on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/nashvillecorps.

UT Extension News: “So You Want to Grow Industrial Hemp?”

From building materials, to animal feed ingredients, to personal care products, the list of uses for industrial hemp is extensive. Since the TN Department of Agriculture first allowed the growing of this crop in 2015 on a pilot basis, interest in this plant has exploded. In many cases, there are still more questions than answers, but there is optimism that this will be a viable crop for Tennessee Farmers. 

It is important to note at the outset that industrial hemp is not the same thing as marijuana, as it has no psychoactive effects. THC is the primary psychoactive component in marijuana. THC levels in marijuana are typically from 3-20%, but in industrial hemp they cannot exceed 0.3%. In other words, industrial hemp will not get you high. 

To grow industrial hemp in Tennessee, you must have a license from the TN Department of Agriculture. The application period for hemp licensing to grow or process is now open and will remain open through February 15, 2019. 

Like other crops in Tennessee, industrial hemp requires the application of good agronomic principles and timely crop management practices. These include planting seed at the proper time, seeding depth, and density in a prepared seedbed consisting of fertile, well-drained productive soils with abundant organic matter, and amending these soils with lime and fertilizer to optimize yield and quality. 

Planting in fields that have low weed and disease pressure is also critical as there are no labeled pesticides for weed control in industrial hemp. This presents a challenge for growers, as does the cost of producing a crop. These costs include licensing fees, seed costs, THC testing fees, and labor.  

UT Extension offices across the state have received calls from landowners who have heard promises of high returns per acre from industrial hemp. No doubt some growers have had high returns, but costs can be significant as well. Furthermore, having a market you can depend on is absolutely critical. With cows, soybeans, or tomatoes, we can pretty much turn our crop into cash any time of the year at a reasonably convenient location, but with industrial hemp the market is much more limited.  

For those who are interested in learning more about industrial hemp, the January session of our Home, Farm, & Garden Lunch and Learn series will be focused on this topic. This session, which will be held at the Smith County Chamber of Commerce on January 2, 2019, will include discussion on rules and regulations, production considerations and suggestions, and risks. The cost of Lunch is $5 and you should call the UT Extension office at (615)735-2900 to reserve your spot, as space is limited.

Brush Creek man killed in hit and run crash in DeKalb County

The following article was written by Dwayne Page and is provided to Smith County Insider courtesy of WJLE. To see the article as it originally appeared, click here.

The THP is looking for a Silver 2006-2010 Jeep Commander SUV similar to the one shown here involved in a fatal hit and run Sunday morning in Smithville. If you have information call the THP at 1-423-954-2130.

(WJLE)—The body of a 51 year old man was found on Highway 70 in front of DeKalb Middle School in the early-morning hours of Sunday, December 9, 2018, the victim of a fatal hit and run.

Dead is Gyula Gulyas of Brush Creek and originally from Hungary.

According to Trooper Bobby Johnson of the Tennessee Highway Patrol, a motorist spotted the body lying in the highway around 2:40 a.m. and reported it to 911. It is not known exactly what time the hit and run occurred.

Trooper Johnson said Gulyas had been at Twisted Oaks on Highway 70 earlier and as he started to leave the parking lot his Kia Soul got stuck in a ditch. Gulyas later got a ride into town and was dropped off near the hospital. That was the last reported sighting of Gulyas alive.

The Tennessee Highway Patrol has not yet found the person or vehicle responsible for the hit and run but believe the automobile was a silver colored 2006 to 2010 model Jeep Commander SUV because of paint chips and pieces of a front grill found on the highway near the body.

If you have information that could help solve the crime, contact the Tennessee Highway Patrol at 1-423-954-2130.

UCEMC Cares awards grants to local organizations

L to R: Front Row:  Beth Davis, Smith County Jail Administrator representing Smith County Sheriff’s Santa’s Shoppers; Jayrah Haley, Sponsor, Gordonsville High School Beta Club; Melody Roth, President, Gordonsville High School Beta Club; (Back Row):  Cathy Kemp, UCEMC Cares; Bob Baker, President, Smith County Adult Ed Advisory Council; Darlana Lytle, Suzette Long and Suzanne Gammons, Xi Beta Xi Chapter Beta Sigma Phi.

 

In October 2018, UCEMCCares Inc. awarded $1000 to the Smith County Sheriff’s Santa’s Shoppers, $1000 to the Gordonsville High School Beta Club, $1000 to the Smith County Adult Ed Advisory Council (September Award), and $1000 to the Xi Beta Xi Chapter Beta Sigma Phi.

 

UCEMC Cares, Inc. is a state chartered, nonprofit corporation designed to accumulate and disburse funds to improve the quality of life in the service area of Upper Cumberland Electric Membership Corporation (UCEMC). For more information, contact your local UCEMC office or visit the UCEMC customer portal at www.ucemc.com.

 

Grand Jury returns over 50 indictments during December 2018 session

As of Monday, December 3, 2018, over indictments were unsealed from the December 2018 session of the Smith County Grand Jury.

See the list of indictments below: 

All subjects are innocent until proven guilty. All mugshots were not immediately available. 

Ricky Dewayne Murphy

The State of Tennessee vs. Ricky Dewayne Murphy

  • {2 Count(s) Aggravated Sexual Battery (Child Under 13)}
  • {2 Count(s) Soliciting Sexual Exploitation of a Minor}
  • {1 Count(s) Continuous Sexual Abuse of a Child}
  • {2 Count(s) Indecent Exposure (Victim Under 13}

The State of Tennessee vs Christopher M. Denney

  • {1 Count(s) Theft under $1,000}

James Paul Hewitt

The State of Tennessee vs James Paul Hewitt, Jr.

  • {1 Count(s) Simple Possession of Schedule II, Methamphetamine}
  • {1 Count(s) Simple Possession of Schedule VI, Marijuana}
  • {1 Count(s) Possession of Drug Paraphernalia}

Jennifer Leigh Mathis

The State of Tennessee vs Jennifer Leigh Mathis

  • {1 Count(s) Theft under $1,000}

George Francis Black

The State of Tennessee vs George Francis Black

  • {1 Count(s) Aggravated Domestic Assault}
  • {1 Count(s) Simple Possession of Schedule VI, Marijuana}
  • {1 Count(s) Possession of Drug Para

John Bradley Dillard

The State of Tennessee vs John Bradley Dillard

  • {1 Count(s) Aggravated Child Abuse – Bodily Injury (under 8)}

Jason William Pearson Jr.

The State of Tennessee vs Jason William Pearson Jr. 

  • {1 Count(s) Interference with Emergency Communication}
  • {1 Count(s) Vandalism under $1,000}
  • {1 Count(s) Underage Consumption}
  • {1 Count(s) Stalking}

Gerald Daniels

The State of Tennessee vs Gerald Daniels

  • {1 Count(s) Theft under $1,000}
  • {1 Count(s) Simple Possession of Schedule VI, Marijuana}
  • {1 Count(s) Possession of Drug Paraphernalia}

Eddie Lee Upchurch

The State of Tennessee vs Eddie Lee Upchurch

  • {1 Count(s) Criminal Trespass}
  • {1 Count(s) Burglary of Auto}
  • {1 Count(s) Attempted Theft over $500}

Steve F. Mabe

The State of Tennessee vs Steve F. Mabe Jr. 

  • {2 Count(s) Criminal Attempt to Commit First Degree Murder}
  • {1 Count(s) Reckless Endangerment}
  • {1 Count(s) Possession of Firearm During Commission of a Felony}
  • {1 Count(s) Unlawful Possession of a Weapon by a Convicted Felon}
  • {1 Count(s) Evading Arrest}
  • {1 Count(s) Theft of Property – $1,000-$10,000}
  • {1 Count(s) Possession Schedule II, Oxycodone}
  • {1 Count(s) Possession Schedule II, Methamphetamine}
  • {1 Count(s) Manufacture Schedule VI}
  • {1 Count(s) Possession of Drug Paraphernalia}

The State of Tennessee vs Carlos A. Young 

  • {1 Count(s) Simple Possession of Schedule II, Methamphetamine}
  • {1 Count(s) Simple Possession of Schedule IV, Diazepam}
  • {1 Count(s) Simple Possession of  Schedule VI, Marijuana}
  • {1 Count(s) Possession of Drug Paraphernalia}
  • {1 Count(s) Possession of a Legend Drug} 

Katherine M. Melton

The State of Tennessee vs Katherine M. Melton

  • {1 Count(s) Possession of a Legend Drug}
  • {1 Count(s) Possession of Drug Paraphernalia}

Ronnie Dale Whitener

The State of Tennessee vs Ronnie Dale Whitener

  • {1 Count(s) Driving on Revoked – 3rd Offense}
  • {1 Count(s) Violation of Registration}
  • {1 Count(s) Failure to Show Proof of Insurance}

Thomas Gregory Upchurch

The State of Tennessee vs Thomas Gregory Upchurch 

  • {1 Count(s) Driving on Revoked – 3rd Offense}
  • {1 Count(s) Seatbelt Law}
  • {1 Count(s) Failure to Show Proof of Insurance}

Jodie A. Lamb-Crum

The State of Tennessee vs Jodie A. Lamb-Crum

  • {1 Count(s) Speeding}
  • {1 Count(s) Unlawful Use of Drivers License (Misdemeanor)}
  • {1 Count(s) Violation of Registration Law}
  • {1 Count(s) Failure to Show Proof of Insurance}
  • {1 Count(s) Driving on Revoked – 5th Offense}

Ronnie C. Johnson

The State of Tennessee vs Ronnie C. Johnson 

  • {1 Count(s) Assault}

Herbert Lee Solomon Jr.

The State of Tennessee vs Herbert Lee Solomon Jr. 

  • {1 Count(s) Possession of a Legend Drug}
  • {1 Count(s) Possession of Drug Paraphernalia}

Roderick Dannell Crowell

The State of Tennessee vs Roderick D. Crowell

  • {1 Count(s) Attempted Second Degree Murder}
  • {1 Count(s) Aggravated Burglary}
  • {1 Count(s) Vandalism under $1,000}
  • {4 Count(s) Reckless Endangerment}

Jason Lee Boulton

The State of Tennessee vs Jason Lee Boulton 

  • {1 Count(s) Domestic Assault}

Sue Ann Manners

The State of Tennessee vs Sue Ann Manners

  • {1 Count(s) Driving Under the Influence – 1st Offense}
  • {1 Count(s) Driving while Blood Alcohol Above Legal Limit}

Carolyn Ann Acuff

The State of Tennessee vs Carolyn Ann Acuff

  • {1 Count(s) Simple Possession Schedule II, Hydrocodone}
  • {1 Count(s) Simple Possession of Schedule IV, Alprazolam}
  • {1 Count(s) Possession of Drug Paraphernalia}

Gayle Lee Settles

The State of Tennessee vs Gayle Lee Settles

  • {1 Cout(s) Speeding}
  • {1 Count(s) Drive with License Revoked}

Nicholas S. Allmon

The State of Tennessee vs Nicholas S. Allmon 

  • {1 Count(s) Vandalism under $1,000}

Timothy S. Payne

The State of Tennessee vs Timothy S. Payne

  • {1 Count(s) Manufacture Schedule VI, Marijuana 1-10}
  • {1 Count(s) Simple Possession of Schedule II, Methamphetamine}
  • {1 Count(s) Possession of Drug Paraphernalia}

Ronnie Dale Whitener

The State of Tennessee vs Ronnie Dale Whitener

  • {1 Count(s) Driving on Revoked – 2nd Offense}
  • {1 Count(s) Failure to Show Proof of Insurance}
  • {1 Count(s) Operation of Due Care}

The State of Tennessee vs Ginger Dixon

  • {1 Count(s) Disorderly Conduct}
  • {1 Count(s) Resisting Arrest}
  • {1 Count(s) Assault}

The State of Tennessee vs Tonia Wynne Doyle

  • {1 Count(s) Driving under the Influence – 2nd Offense}
  • {1 Count(s) Failure to Show Proof of Insurance}
  • {1 Count(s) Driving while Blood Alcohol Above Legal Limit}

Stephen W. Fitts

The State of Tennessee vs Stephen W. Fitts

  • {1 Count(s) Allowing Animals to Run at Large}

Brent Donovan Ross

The State of Tennessee vs Brent Donovan Ross

  • {1 Count(s) Driving while Impaired and Under the Age of 21}
  • {1 Count(s) Reckless Endangerment}
  • {1 Count(s) Speeding}
  • {1 Count(s) Improper Passing}
  • {1 Count(s) Driving without a License}
  • {1 Count(s) Safety Belt Required for Passenger(s)}
  • {1 Count(s) Failure to Show Proof of Insurance}
  • {1 Count(s) Driving while Blood Alcohol Above Legal Limit}

Sam Weatherly

The State of Tennessee vs Sam Weatherly

  • {1 Count(s) Vandalism (up to $1,000)}

The State of Tennessee vs Larry D. Kinslow

  • {18 Count(s) Worthless Check under $500}

Melissa A. Caldwell

The State of Tennessee vs Melissa Ann Caldwell

  • {1 Count(s) Simple Possession of Schedule II, Methamphetamine}
  • {1 Count(s) Simple Possession Schedule II, Hydrocodone}
  • {1 Count(s) Possession of Drug Paraphernalia}
  • {1 Count(s) Failure to Show Proof of Insurance}
  • {1 Count(s) Drive with License Suspended/Cancelled/Revoked}
  • {1 Count(s) Violation of Light Law}

Amber N. Wylemans

The State of Tennessee vs Amber N. Wylemans

  • {1 Count(s) Driving on Revoked – 5th Offense}

Brandy Nicole Luper

The State of Tennessee vs Brandy Nicole Luper

  • {1 Count(s) Violation of Light Law}
  • {1 Count(s) Failure to Show Proof of Insurance}
  • {1 Count(s) Possession of Drug Paraphernalia}

The State of Tennessee vs Michael W. Jones

  • {1 Count(s) Failure to Dim Highbeam Headlights}
  • {1 Count(s) Failure to Show Proof of Insurance}
  • {1 Count(s) Drive with License Revoked}

Jack Wayne Givens

The State of Tennessee vs Jack Wayne Givens 

  • {1 Count(s) Simple Possession Schedule II, Oxycodone}
  • {1 Count(s) Simple Possession Schedule III, Buprenorphine}

Louie Wayne Silcox

The State of Tennessee vs Louie W. Silcox

  • {1 Count(s) Drive with License Revoked}

The State of Tennessee vs Sean P. Patterson

  • {1 Count(s) Simple Possession of Schedule VI, Marijuana}
  • {1 Count(s) Possession of Drug Paraphernalia}

Priscilla Marie Stewart

The State of Tennessee vs Priscilla Stewart

  • {1 Count(s) Possession of Drug Paraphernalia}
  • {1 Count(s) Theft under $1,000}

The State of Tennessee vs Suzanne Renee Scott

  • {1 Count(s) Simple Possession of Schedule VI, Marijuana}
  • {1 Count(s) Simple Possession of Schedule IV, Alprazolam}
  • {1 Count(s) Possession of Drug Paraphernalia}

The State of Tennessee vs Savannah Dymond Marie Varela

  • {1 Count(s) Speeding}
  • {1 Count(s) Failure to Show Proof of Insurance}
  • {1 Count(s) Drive with License Suspended}

The State of Tennessee vs Crystal D. Mofield

  • {1 Count(s) Simple Possession of Schedule VI, Marijuana}
  • {1 Count(s) Simple Possession of Schedule IV, Diazepam}
  • {1 Count(s) Simple Possession of Schedule II, Methamphetamine}
  • {1 Count(s) Possession of a Legend Drug}
  • {1 Count(s) Possession of Drug Paraphernalia}

Watts appointed to fill vacant council seat, elected Vice-Mayor of Carthage City Council

Matthew Watts was appointed to fill a vacant seat on the Carthage City Council during the meeting of the council on Thursday, December 6, 2018.

A seat on the council was vacated by Councilman Randy Dennis, who chose to step down due to health issues. 

The City of Carthage issued a public notice on November 29, 2018, to inform Carthage citizens that the council would appoint a new member at its next meeting. Qualified citizens were encouraged to submit letters of interest.

Five Carthage citizens—Matthew Watts, Mark Grover, Phillip Kinslow, Roy Ethridge, and Kevin Burris—submitted letters expressing interest in the position. Each potential candidate was given three minutes to address the council and explain why they wished to serve on the Carthage City Council.

After hearing from all the candidates, the council voted 4-1 to appoint Matthew Watts to fill the unexpired term. 

Watts has previously served on the Carthage City Council, and his name appeared as an incumbent on the November 6, 2018, ballot. He received a total of 204 votes, coming in behind Cole Ebel (314 votes), Sam Petty (260), and Billy K. Reece (254 votes).

Watts was sworn in following the council’s vote. Watts’s term began on December 6, 2018, and will continue until November 3, 2020.

The Carthage City Council also elected a Vice-Mayor during the December 6 meeting. 

Councilwoman Barbara Kanappel was initially nominated for the position but respectfully declined the nomination.

Councilman Watts, Councilwoman Scott, and Councilman Ebel expressed interest in the Vice-Mayor position, and the council took a vote on those three candidates. 

The Carthage City Council voted 5-1 to elect Matthew Watts to serve as Vice-Mayor of the Carthage City Council. 

The following members currently sit on the Carthage City Council:

  • Mayor Sarah Marie Smith
  • Vice-Mayor Matt Watts
  • Councilwoman Barbara Kannapel
  • Councilwoman Jacquelyn M. Scott
  • Councilman Sam Petty
  • Councilman Bill K. Reece
  • Councilman Cole Ebel

The Carthage City Council meets at 6:00 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month inside the James A. Clay Municipal Building in Carthage, Tennessee.

The next meeting of the Carthage City Council will be held on Thursday, January 3, 2019. This meeting will be live-streamed by Smith County Insider.

Interested citizens can stay updated on the Town of Carthage by visiting this website or checking the town’s Facebook page.

Smith County hunters can feed hungry, win muzzleloader by donating deer

Hunters for the Hungry connects generous hunters in Smith County with Tennesseans in need.

 

 NASHVILLE, Tenn.—The Tennessee Wildlife Federation’s Hunters for the Hungry program is in full swing for the 2018 deer season. More than 80 processors throughout the state are now accepting donations of whole deer to help feed local families in need.

 

In Smith County, one participating processor is Mink’s Deer Processing, located at 79 Shoulders Lane in Dixon Springs. Contact information and a full list of processors is available at tnwf.org/processors.

 

Through the generosity of hunters over 20 years, Hunters for the Hungry has provided more than 6.5 million meals worth of healthy, much-needed protein to the hungriest Tennesseans. As a thank you for those years of support, hunters will be entered in a drawing for each whole deer they donate to win one of four made-in-Tennessee muzzleloaders by Knight Rifles. More information, including alternate ways to enter, can be found at tnwf.org/HuntersForTheHungry.

 

“This is a really exciting year. We’ve had multiple record-breaking years recently and we’re adding more processors and counties to our program,” said Matt Simcox, Hunters for the Hungry manager. “Even with the tough season for hunters last year, we still saw incredible giving. This program works because of Tennessee’s volunteer spirit in our hunters and processors. Without them, there would be fewer full bellies this time of year.”

 

When hunters harvest a deer, they can donate the it—in part or whole—to the program at a participating processor. The deer is processed, and the venison is delivered to local hunger relief organizations where it gets in the hands of hungry children and families. One deer provides as many as 168 meals.

 

Currently, all participating processors in the state are funded, meaning there is no cost to hunters to donate their venison. When deer donations surpass funding, hunters may pay a reduced, $50 processing fee directly to the processor to cover processing costs or redeem Deer Coins purchased from Tennessee Wildlife Federation at tnwf.org/DeerCoin.

 

“In addition to the support of countless individuals, Hunters for the Hungry is thankful for contributions by companies,” said Simcox. “Walmart Giving, in particular, has been a longtime supporter as they fight hunger in the communities their stores serve.”

 

For more information about Hunters for the Hungry or to purchase a Deer Coin, visit tnwf.org/HuntersForTheHungry.

 

The Tennessee Wildlife Federation leads the conservation, sound management and wise use of Tennessee’s great outdoors. Since 1946, the Federation has spearheaded the development of the state’s wildlife policy, advanced landmark legislation on air and water quality and other conservation initiatives, helped restore numerous species, and introduced thousands of kids to the great outdoors. To learn more, visit tnwf.org.

Wilson Bank and Trust presents donation to The Emmanuel House of Smith County

The Emmanuel House Board Members (L to R) Junior Nesbitt, Kandra Preston, Bill Woodard, and Monica Mowdy accept a donation check from Wilson Bank and Trust, presented by Holleigh Upchurch.

The Training and Sales Department at Wilson Bank and Trust recently made a $1,000 donation to the board of directors of The Emmanuel House in Smith County. 

This donation was the final step in an ongoing charitable partnership between the Wilson Bank and Trust employee team and The Emmanuel House.

In September, a group of Wilson Bank and Trust employees volunteered their time to assist with renovations of The Emmanuel House. Volunteers helped disassemble and remove an unusable shed in back of the property, cleaned the inside of the house, and moved furniture.

A team of Wilson Bank and Trust volunteers assist with renovations of The Emmanuel House.

The Emmanuel House is a nonprofit emergency shelter for women and children based in Smith County, Tennessee.

The original Emmanuel Hose in Smith County closed in 2017, but the house is currently being renovated in a project spearheaded by Kandra Preston. The Emmanuel House plans to open its doors again in the spring of 2019.

The Emmanuel House is a 12-bedroom facility that will be able to serve women with and without substance abuse issues who need assistance getting back on their feet.

The house is located at 703 Main Street North in Carthage, Tennessee.

Follow along with progress on The Emmanuel House renovation and learn how you can help by visiting and liking their Facebook page. 

Opportunities to meet Santa at local businesses this Christmas season

Photo courtesy of Wilson Bank & Trust

Santa Claus is coming to town! Santa will be visiting several local businesses in Carthage and Gordonsville throughout the month of December to take pictures with children, listen to Christmas wishes, and spread holiday cheer.

On Saturday, December 8, 2018, Santa will be available for pictures at Wilson Bank & Trust in Carthage from 10:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. The Carthage Branch of Wilson Bank and Trust is located at 1300 Main Street North in Carthage, Tennessee.

On Friday, December 14, 2018, Santa will be at the Main Branch of Citizens Bank (located at 407 Main Street North in Carthage, Tennessee) from 3:30 p.m. until 5:00 p.m.

On Saturday, December 15, 2018, Santa will be at the Gordonsville Branch of Citizens Bank (located at 530 Gordonsville Highway in Gordonsville, Tennessee) from 9:00 a.m. until 10:30 a.m.

Be sure to bring your own camera to get a photo with Santa!

On Sunday, December 16, 2018, Santa will be visiting Ebel’s Tavern with the Kirby Team from 2:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m. Cookies will be served! Ebel’s Tavern is located at 104 East 3rd Avenue in Carthage, Tennessee.

The Kirby Team at Blackwell Realty and Auction would like to wish everyone a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

 

Man jailed after meth, pills, paraphernalia found in vehicle

Shane E. McClanahan

(Smith County Insider Press)—On November 19, 2018, Shane E. McClanahan (38, Lebanon) was arrested on drug charges after Smith County Sheriff’s Department Sergeant Kendra Grisham responded to a tip about an unconscious male in a vehicle on Enigma Road in Elmwood, Tennessee.

According to the police report, Sergeant Grisham observed McClanahan, who appeared to be asleep in his vehicle, when she arrived on the scene. Sergeant Grisham approached McClanahan, woke him up, and asked that he exit the vehicle.

During a search of the vehicle, a white oval tablet which was identified as Acetaminophen Hydrocodone (Lortab) and approximately 3.5 grams of a crystal like substance that tested positive for methamphetamine were found. Approximately 4 grams of marijuana, a “one hitter” pipe, and a set of digital scales were also found inside the vehicle.

Additionally, several weapons were located in the vehicle: a Smith and Wesson M7P shield 40 caliber handgun, a Savage 243 rifle, and a Thompson/Center 50 caliber muzzleloader.

McClanahan denied possession of the marijuana, methamphetamine, Lortab, and paraphernalia.

McClanahan was placed under arrest and transported to the Smith County Jail for booking.

McClanahan is charged with felony possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of a Schedule II drug, possession of methamphetamine, and possession of a Schedule VI drug. 

4-H News: Give the Gift of Camp

Submitted by Katie Clark – Smith County Extension Agent:

2018 Smith County 4-H Campers

Did you attend 4-H camp as a child? Do you want today’s youth to have the opportunity to participate in activities including zip lining, swimming, shooting sports, group sports, fishing, kayaking/canoeing, nature hikes, leather craft and woodworking, t-shirt airbrushing, skits, music, and more? Clyde M. York 4-H Center in Crossville, TN gives today’s 4-H members opportunities to have fun while learning valuable life skills like respect, responsibility, and team work.

Last year, fifty-seven 4th through 6th grade 4-H’ers attended Junior Camp from Smith County. Thanks to generous community support and donations, nine of those 4-H’ers were able to attend on a half scholarship.

Junior 4-H Camp costs $290 to attend. While this includes meals, lodging, transportation, a t-shirt, and so many amazing activities, we know that cost is difficult for many families. We want all youth to have the opportunity to enjoy 4-H camp, so we need your help. We are committed to increasing the amount of partial scholarships available for Smith County 4-H’ers to attend camp. To do this we need business, organizations, or individuals to pledge $145, which is half the cost to send one child to camp.

What better way to celebrate this holiday season than by giving a child the gift of 4-H Camp?

Donors may choose to remain anonymous or to receive recognition for your donation to the 4-H program.

If you, or someone you know, wish to donate a partial or full camp scholarship to a child in need, call the Extension office at (615)735-2900 or email kclark54@utk.edu for more information.

Jewelry show to benefit Riverview Regional Medical Center Volunteers planned for December 7, 2018

On Friday, December 7, 2018, the Riverview Regional Medical Center Volunteers will host their 5th Annual Jewelry Show inside the Riverview Regional cafeteria from 7:00 a.m. until 3:00 p.m.

This year’s show will feature Jewelry by DeeDee.

Jewelry by DeeDee offers timeless, simple, and elegant pieces, as well as more modern hammered aluminum and copper pieces. Pieces with leather, gemstones, and metal will also be available for purchase. Any jewelry enthusiast is sure to find something they will love!

Come by and see DeeDee’s jewelry collection and help support the volunteers at Riverview Regional Medical Center!

Community Cross Lighting Project lights up the neighborhood in Sykes

Members of the Sykes community are proudly displaying crosses in their yard to celebrate the Christmas season and spread Christmas joy as part of the “aCROSS Sykes” Community Cross Lighting Project.

In recent days, many crosses have appeared in the nighttime landscape for all to see as they drive through Sykes, Tennessee. 24 crosses can currently be counted on the drive from Hickman to Brush Creek.

All members of the Sykes community are encouraged to display crosses in their yards, and everyone is invited to take a leisurely drive through the area to enjoy the Christmas lights.

Judging of the cross displays will take place on December 14, and the winner will receive a $50 Visa card. For more information, contact Robin Underwood at (615) 489-5921.

All crosses will be on display through December 25.

“I hope as people travel through our little community during this Christmas season we are reminded of the Greatest Gift Ever. From the manger to the cross the communities of Sykes, Hickman and Brush Creek celebrate the birth of our Savior—Jesus Christ,” said event organizer Robin Underwood.

Share pictures of your crosses with Smith County Insider on Facebook!

Bass Funeral Home Remembrance Service to be held on December 9, 2018

On Sunday, December 9, 2018, Bass Funeral Home will host its 8th Annual Remembrance Service at 3:00 p.m. at the Smith County Ag Center.

This special service is designed so that families can take time out of the busy holiday season to remember those they have lost.

Brother Tim Frank with Carthage First Baptist Church will lead the memorial service, and music will accompany throughout. 

Those who attend the service are encouraged to bring a picture of their loved one to set on a remembrance table, where the pictures will be displayed throughout the service.

“If you have been in previous years, please feel free to join us again,” the Bass family commented. “The Christmas season is a time of celebration and joy and thankfulness, but also a time to remember our loved ones and honor their memory.”

For the 8th consecutive year, Bass Funeral Home will be providing a memorial “Guardian Angel” ornament to every family they served in 2018.

Join Bass Funeral Home in creating new Christmas traditions by recalling precious memories and honoring loved ones at the Remembrance Service.

If you have any questions about the program or wish to RSVP, please call (615)735-1212 or (615)683-8212.

Local churches present “The Insanity of God” film screening – December 7, 2018

You Are Invited!

 

A screening of the movie The Insanity of God: A True Story of Faith and Persecution will take place on Friday, December 7, 2018, at 6:30 p.m. at the Smith County Ag Center.

 

The Insanity of God is the true story of missionaries Nik and Ruth Ripken. After the death of their son, this ordinary couple journeys into the depths of the persecuted church, asking the question: Is Jesus worth it?

 

The movie is free, and everyone is welcome to attend!

 

For more information, call Gordon at (615) 477-0779.

 

This film screening is sponsored by several local churches in the area.

 

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