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April 2021 Meeting of the Gordonsville City Council

The Gordonsville City Council held its monthly meeting on Monday, April 12th, 2021.

You can watch the full council meeting below.

Subscribe to Smith County Insider’s YouTube channel to stay up-to-date on meeting coverage, business spotlights, video features, and more!

The Gordonsville City Council meets at 6:15 p.m. on the second Monday of each month at Gordonsville City Hall, located at 63 Main Street in Gordonsville.

All meetings are open to the public and streamed live at https://www.facebook.com/smithcountyinsider/.

Councilman Ebel Removed from April Carthage City Council Meeting

Town of Carthage Councilman Cole Ebel was removed during the most recent Carthage City Council Meeting on April 1, 2021 after being deemed to be out-of-order.

During the opening of the meeting, Councilman Steve Babcock made a motion “to limit discussion on each agenda item to two minutes per councilman per agenda item.” Councilwoman Barbara Kannapel seconded this motion. Councilman Ebel made the only discussion on the motion. The council voted 5-1 to pass the motion, with Councilman Ebel being the lone no vote.

During the Unfinished Business portion of the meeting, Councilman Ebel motioned to pass Item #1 Building Inspection Fees Resolution that would eliminate building inspection fees in the city. This motion did not receive a second, so the meeting continued to the next item.

Councilman Ebel then made a motion to pass Item #2 2A Sanctuary City Resolution. Councilman Ebel’s motion included reading the resolution. After just under two minutes elapsed of Councilman Ebel speaking, Mayor Sarah Marie Smith ruled Councilman Ebel over his time limit and ruled his action Out-of-Order. Councilman Ebel refuted this, and Mayor Smith and Councilman Ebel continued back and forth for about 20 seconds before Councilwoman Barbara Kannapel made a recommendation “for the officer to remove this person who has been asked to stop and has been out-of-order.” City Attorney Todd Moore then asked Councilman Ebel to make a motion only and not read the entire resolution per previous precedent. Councilman Ebel asked if he had gone over his time limit and was ruled to have been over. Councilman Ebel made a motion, but it failed due to a lack of a second.

Councilman Ebel then attempted to make a motion to pass Item #3 Property Tax Resolution. After Councilman Ebel had spoken for approximately sixteen seconds, Mayor Smith stated that the motion had been made and the council could read the resolution themselves. Councilman Ebel stated that he still had time to read his motion and would like to do so. During a back and forth between the councilman and mayor, all other members of the council began to stand up and/or leave. Councilwoman Kannapel stated that “this is not a civil meeting, so either the person who is out-of-order needs to be removed or the council needs to leave.”

Mayor Smith then requested Police Chief Brit Davis to remove Councilman Ebel. The councilman made a few remarks and left the meeting without incident, and the council meeting continued without consideration of the Property Tax Resolution.

The Town of Carthage has formally adopted Robert’s Rules of Order for parliamentary procedure; however, no motion or vote of removal of the councilman was put forth by the council. The councilman’s removal from the meeting does not appear to have been done correctly as Robert’s Rules of Order states a member of the assembly may only be removed by a vote of the assembly.

In an email to the mayor and council on Tuesday April 6th, City Attorney Todd Moore stated that he believed Mayor Smith was within her authority to remove Councilman Ebel during the meeting. He also stated that he “researched Roberts’ Rules and it is my opinion that Cole should not have been asked to leave the meeting without a vote by the council.” Attorney Moore also recommended the council address this issue and allow Councilman Ebel to present his resolutions for consideration during its next meeting.

You can watch the full meeting below.

April 2021 Meeting of the Carthage City Council

The Carthage City Council held its monthly meeting on Thursday, April 1, 2021, at 6:00 pm.

The meeting was held at the Smith County Chamber of Commerce because the performance hall was not adequately heated. Social distancing was practiced throughout the meeting.

Watch the full meeting below.

Thanks to Smith County Animal Clinic for sponsoring Smith County Insider’s live broadcast of this meeting.

Subscribe to Smith County Insider’s YouTube channel to stay up-to-date on meeting coverage, business spotlights, video features, and more!

The Carthage City Council meets at 6:00 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month at Carthage City Hall, located at 314 Spring Street in Carthage, Tennessee – 37030.

All meetings are open to the public and streamed live at https://www.facebook.com/smithcountyinsider/.

Press Release: Representative John Rose Reveals Plans for 117th Congress

by John Rose, U.S. Representative – Tennessee’s Sixth Congressional District

The 117th Congress is just beginning, and it is my sincere honor to serve a second term as your U.S. Representative for the Sixth Congressional District. As a lifelong Tennessean, it is a privilege to be your voice in Washington and to fight for Tennessee values every day. This position is my first elected office; I am not a career politician and have no intention of acting like one. This Congress, I will continue putting Tennesseans first by working to fix our broken budget system in Washington, put us back on the road to economic recovery, expand broadband in rural areas, sharpen the focus on election integrity, protect community pharmacies, and act as your conservative voice as I cast my vote. As an eighth-generation farmer, I am not afraid of hard work – and I think it’s time the 117th Congress gets down to business by doing the work of the American people. 

House Democrats entered the new Congress with a razor thin majority due to House Republicans’ significant gains in the 2020 elections. The Democrats’ slim majority brings with it some possibilities for House Republicans to pass some commonsense legislation by enlisting five or six moderate Democrats to join us in a bipartisan effort. Our nation cannot afford to turn back the progress of the last four years. From passing historic tax cuts for Americans to the signing of the USMCA, which bolstered freer markets, fairer trade, and strengthened economic growth—under the leadership of President Trump and his Administration, promises made were promises kept. 

As we continue to build on that progress, we must be mindful that our national debt has loomed to just over $28 trillion. The debt and deficit not only hurt our economy, but also affect our national security and the economic security of future generations. I hear concerns from business owners and constituents about the insufficiency of Congress to get its fiscal house in order. As your representative in Washington, I will consistently support efforts to cut spending, root out waste, and balance the federal budget. 

Recovering from the coronavirus pandemic and reopening our economy remains a top priority. As a small business owner and entrepreneur, I understand what small businesses need to be successful – and also what will stifle them. I will continue fighting for Main Street this Congress by trying to repeal draconian lockdowns across the country and getting timely, targeted, and temporary COVID-19 relief to businesses and families that are struggling. Additionally, a full economic reopening will not be possible without adequate testing and vaccine distribution – a task I believe should be a main focus these next few months. 

The pandemic has further highlighted the lack of internet access for rural Americans. I will be working this Congress to close the digital divide in our rural communities. As long as those in more urban areas have access to basic technological resources that others in rural areas do not, a substantial percentage of our population is at risk of falling behind. Reliable high-speed internet connectivity is critical to economic development, education, quality telemedicine, and the ability of state and local officials to communicate with their constituencies—this will be one of my top priorities.

I will also continue to work with my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to protect our community pharmacies. Last year,I led the effort to keep our community pharmacies open by cracking down on harmful Big Pharma practices that take advantage of these small businesses. I will continue to stand up for our local pharmacies and advocate for those who feel their needs are being ignored.

Finally, I pledge to be your conservative voice in Washington. I will be working to secure our borders, protect life, support our men and women in uniform, and as a lifetime member of the National Rifle Association, I will be fighting to preserve and protect our Second Amendment rights. 

With the input of Tennesseans as my continued guide, I look forward to working hard this session to make progress on these and other issues important to the Sixth District. There remains no better place to get national direction than here in Tennessee where commonsense prevails. Thank you to the many Tennesseans who continue to share your thoughtful insights with me on the issues before Congress.

March 2021 Meeting of the Smith County Board of Education

The Smith County Board of Education met at 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday, March 16, 2021.

You can watch the full meeting below.

Thanks to Judy Smith and Lacey Crockett of Blackwell Realty for sponsoring the live broadcast of this meeting.

Subscribe to Smith County Insider’s YouTube channel to stay up-to-date on meeting coverage, business spotlights, video features, and more!

The Smith County School Board meets on the third Tuesday of each month at 5:00 p.m. at the Smith County Board of Education, located at 126 Smith County Middle School Lane in Carthage, Tennessee.

The next school board meeting will be held on Tuesday, April 20, 2021.

All meetings are open to the public and streamed live at https://www.facebook.com/smithcountyinsider/.

Smith County Mayor Jeff Mason’s March 2021 County Commission Report

See below for Smith County Mayor Jeff Mason’s March 2021 County Commission Report.. You can follow Mayor Mason on Facebook and see reports on the Smith County Government’s website at https://smithcotn.com. You may also view the full March Commission meeting here

Opening Remarks

A big thank you goes out to all the departments that did their jobs and did them well during the weather events in the past few weeks. Departments worked together on many separate issues to ensure that citizens’ needs and safety were taken care of.

Governor’s Money

We are looking at some building improvements and vehicle maintenance with the remaining amount of the governor’s money. 

Baker Property

We are still working through the best options for moving forward with the property. 

Salary Study

Thompson and Associates is compiling data from comparable counties. The goal still is to have this done by late April.

2020 Census Data

Census data has been pushed back to September or October. This is going to make the process and timeline very short in getting this done.

COVID-19

COVID-19 numbers continue trending down from the peak around the New Year’s holiday.  Demand for vaccinations continues to be strong. The Health Department started a new appointment software, and the transitioning to Phase 1c caused a few headaches in getting all the appointments booked. The Health Department is now using the Ag Center complex for vaccinations and testing. Moving to the Ag Center gives them more room to test and administer vaccinations efficiently. 

Actions taken by the County Commission on 3-8-21

  • Budget Amendments
  • Two Bridge Dedications in memory of Stanford Maynard and Phillip Evitts.
  • The commission passed a resolution and will be sending that resolution to the legislature to keep certificates of necessity for local hospitals as law. This makes sure our local hospitals remain able to offer services that keep them financially stable and in business.

Budget Discussions

Budget hearings began last week for the 2021-2022 budget.

As we begin budget hearings, I presented my goals for next year’s budget. I will summarize them below.

In 2019, we passed a significant property tax increase. I do not know one person that was happy about what had to be done. Twenty-five cents of the increase was set aside to build a fund balance of three million dollars in 3 years.

We have been realistic with revenue projections and tried to be good stewards of the appropriated funds. By these actions, we will hit our goal of three million in 2 years. I have asked the Budget and Finance Committee to reduce the property tax collection amount by one million dollars in the next budget. We asked you, the citizens, to pay more to meet this goal. You did, and now it is time to reduce that amount from the tax rate.

Goal number two is to pay off all short-term debt at the end of the 2020-2021 fiscal year. We refinanced our long-term debt through a bond sale in December. This reduced years, interest, and the amount needed to service debt each year. There will be a surplus in the debt service fund that should pay off all short-term notes. I am asking the commission to give their approval to pay this debt off this year.

Goal number three is to reallocate 5 cents of property tax from debt service to the capital projects fund. This will allow us to fund capital project needs every year at approximately four hundred thousand dollars. This fund will enable us to maintain our vehicle needs for police and emergency services without borrowing short-term debt like was done in the past. It will also allow funds to provide large repairs to buildings when those needs arise.

Thank you for allowing me to be Mayor of the greatest place in the world!

Jeff Mason

March 2021 Meeting of the Smith County Commission

The Smith County Commission held its March meeting on the evening of Monday, March 8th, 2021. You may see a copy of the agenda here.

You can watch the full meeting below.

Thanks to Powell & Meadows Insurance Agency for sponsoring the live broadcast of this meeting.

Subscribe to Smith County Insider’s YouTube channel to stay up-to-date on meeting coverage, business spotlights, video features, and more!

The Smith County Board of Commissioners meets on the second Monday of every month except December.

Typically, commission meetings are held in the General Sessions Courtroom of the Smith County Jail and Courts Facility, located at 322 Justice Drive in Carthage. During the July 2020 Meeting of the Smith County Commission, commissioners voted to hold all meetings at the Smith County Ag Center until the COVID-19 pandemic is over.

All meetings are open to the public and are streamed live at https://www.facebook.com/smithcountyinsider/.

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March 2021 Meeting of the Gordonsville City Council

The Gordonsville City Council held its monthly meeting on Monday, March 8th, 2021.

Tonight, Danny Williams was appointed to the Gordonsville City Council. The vacant seat was previously held by Sam Bowles who was elected in November. He recently resigned and moved out of the city. 

You can watch the full council meeting below.

Subscribe to Smith County Insider’s YouTube channel to stay up-to-date on meeting coverage, business spotlights, video features, and more!

The Gordonsville City Council meets at 6:15 p.m. on the second Monday of each month at Gordonsville City Hall, located at 63 Main Street in Gordonsville.

All meetings are open to the public and streamed live at https://www.facebook.com/smithcountyinsider/.

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March 2021 Meeting of the Carthage City Council

The Carthage City Council held its monthly meeting on Thursday, March 4, 2021, at 6:00 pm.

The meeting was held at the Smith County Chamber of Commerce because the performance hall was not adequately heated. Social distancing was practiced throughout the meeting.

Several items were discussed such as: Budget Amendment, Steven’s building repair, lighting at the City Park Ball Field, Crosswalk/ parking/ speed limits, Zoning ordinances, Building inspection fees, etc.

Watch the full meeting below.

Thanks to Smith County Animal Clinic for sponsoring Smith County Insider’s live broadcast of this meeting.

Subscribe to Smith County Insider’s YouTube channel to stay up-to-date on meeting coverage, business spotlights, video features, and more!

The Carthage City Council meets at 6:00 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month at Carthage City Hall, located at 314 Spring Street in Carthage, Tennessee – 37030.

All meetings are open to the public and streamed live at https://www.facebook.com/smithcountyinsider/.

Press Release: Representative John Rose Reflects on One-Year Anniversary of Middle Tennessee Tornado Victims

by John Rose, U.S. Representative – Tennessee’s Sixth Congressional District

WASHINGTON—Today, U.S. Representative John Rose (TN-6) released this statement reflecting on the one-year anniversary of the catastrophic tornado that tragically struck Middle Tennessee, causing tangible damage in Smith County, and devasting communities in Putnam and Wilson counties:

“As we mark one year since the devasting tornado tore through Middle Tennessee, let us take time to pause and remember the lives that were sadly lost, the many families and businesses that were tragically affected, and the brave first responders that put their lives on the line to rescue others.

“The morning of Tuesday, March 3, 2020, 22 lost their lives, and major damage to homes, buildings, roads, bridges, utilities, and businesses was reported. This one-year anniversary is a very somber reminder of the fragility of life, the deadly force of nature, and the void we feel since the passing of the friends, family, and neighbors we lost.

“The day after the deadly storm hit, I visited the affected communities and have returned many times in the weeks and months that followed this unprecedented tragedy. I’ve seen firsthand the transition from dealing with disaster to rebuilding.

“Today, the Sixth Congressional District stands as a symbol of the extraordinary resilience of the individuals who live and work here. There was no hesitation from emergency workers and community members to begin the cleanup and salvage process. They didn’t wait for the cavalry to arrive; they just went to work for their fellow man. This bias for action, the deeply rooted belief that we are our brother’s keeper, defines the Volunteer Spirit.

“In the face of tragedy and in the face of hardship, Tennesseans come together to help restore, rebuild, and create a better future—just like they did one year ago today. My family and I will continue to pray for the lives lost and for the continued efforts to rebuild even stronger.”

In Congress, Representative Rose fought alongside his Tennessee colleagues to secure federal resources for the victims to ensure they had what they needed to help rebuild. Following their actions, President Trump approved federal assistance for the storm ravaged communities to help with recovery and rebuilding efforts. Representative Rose accompanied President Trump during the former President’s tour of the damage, meeting with tornado survivors, and visit to Jefferson Avenue Church of Christ in Cookeville, which served as a relief hub for several months following the storm.

U.S. Representative John Rose is currently serving his second term representing Tennessee’s Sixth Congressional District and resides in Cookeville with his wife, Chelsea, and their son, Guy. The Sixth District includes Cannon, Clay, Coffee, Cumberland, DeKalb, Fentress, Jackson, Macon, Overton, Pickett, Putnam, Robertson, Smith, Sumner, Trousdale, White, and Wilson counties as well as portions of Cheatham and Van Buren counties. Representative Rose is an eighth-generation farmer, small business owner, and currently serves on the Financial Services Committee.

Press Release: Representative John Rose Local Office Hours for March

by John Rose, U.S. Representative – Tennessee’s Sixth Congressional District

COOKEVILLE, TN—Every month, U.S. Representative John Rose’s (TN-6) district staff hold a series of local office hours for constituents to connect directly with caseworkers and receive assistance with federal agencies. Due to previous COVID-19 restrictions, local office hours were temporarily suspended, but will resume in March and be held in Cannon, Clay, Coffee, Cumberland, DeKalb, Fentress, Jackson, Overton, Pickett, Robertson, Smith, Trousdale, White, and Wilson counties.

During the local office hours, district staff will be available to answer questions and assist constituents with federal casework, such as social security and veterans benefits, steps for obtaining a passport, and more. Local office hours occur monthly, if you have questions, please contact one of Representative Rose’s offices so a staff member may help you.

“It is important to me, and the staff members, that we are always available and working to help the great people of the Sixth District,” said Representative Rose. “Keeping an open dialogue with my neighbors allows me to hear their concerns about significant issues facing our communities and best represent those perspectives in Washington.”

Details for local office hours can be found below and on Representative Rose’s website

Wednesday, March 3rd

  • TIME: 9:00-10:00 am
  • WHAT: White County Local Office Hours
  • LOCATION: White County Courthouse, Executive Conference Rm., 1 E Bockman Way, Sparta, TN 38583.
  • WHO: Congressman Rose will be represented by District Director Rebecca Foster during this visit.
  • TIME: 10:00-11:00 am
  • WHAT: Coffee County Local Office Hours
  • LOCATION: Tullahoma City Hall, 201 W Grundy Street, Tullahoma, TN 37388
  • WHO: Representative Rose will be represented by Field Representative Lou Nave during this visit.
  • TIME: 2:00-3:00 pm
  • WHAT: Cumberland County Local Office Hours
  • LOCATION: Cumberland County Courthouse, 2 N Main Street, Crossville, TN 38555.
  • WHO: Representative Rose will be represented by District Director Rebecca Foster during this visit.

Thursday, March 4th

  • TIME: 10:00-11:00 am
  • WHAT: Trousdale County Local Office Hours
  • LOCATION: County Administration Building, 328 Broadway, Hartsville, TN 37074
  • WHO: Representative Rose will be represented by Deputy District Director Ray Render during this visit.
  • TIME: 11:00-12:00 pm
  • WHAT: Coffee County Local Office Hours
  • LOCATION: Coffee County Administrative Plaza, 1329 McArthur Street, Manchester, TN 37355
  • WHO: Representative Rose will be represented by Field Representative Lou Nave during this visit.
  • TIME: 1:00-2:00 pm
  • WHAT: Macon County Local Office Hours
  • LOCATION: Lafayette City Hall, 200 E Locust Street, Lafayette, TN 37083
  • WHO: Representative Rose will be represented by Deputy District Director Ray Render during this visit.

Wednesday March 10th

  • TIME: 9:00-10:00 am
  • WHAT: Wilson County Local Office Hours
  • LOCATION: Wilson County Courthouse, 134 S College Street Ste 200, Lebanon, TN 37087
  • WHO: Representative Rose will be represented by Deputy District Director Ray Render during this visit.
  • TIME: 1:00-2:00 pm
  • WHAT: Cannon County Local Office Hours
  • LOCATION: Cannon County Senior Center, 609 Lehman Street, Woodbury, TN 37190
  • WHO: Representative Rose will be represented by Field Representative Lou Nave during this visit.
  • TIME: 2:00-3:00 pm
  • WHAT: Robertson County Local Office Hours
  • LOCATION: Springfield City Hall, 405 N Main Street, Springfield, TN 37172
  • WHO: Representative Rose will be represented by Deputy District Director Ray Render during this visit.

Thursday March 11th

  • TIME: 1:00-2:00 pm
  • WHAT: Cumberland County Local Office Hours
  • LOCATION: Village Green Mall, 126 Stonehenge Drive, Crossville, TN 38558
  • WHO: Representative Rose will be represented by District Director Rebecca Foster during this visit.

Friday March 12th

  • TIME: 9:00-10:00 am
  • WHAT: Clay County Local Office Hours
  • LOCATION: Clay County Senior Center, 145 Cordell Hull Drive, Celina, TN 38551
  • WHO: Congressman Rose will be represented by District Director Rebecca Foster during this visit.
  • TIME: 12:00-1:00 pm
  • WHAT: Jackson County Local Office Hours
  • LOCATION: Jackson County Library, 205 W. Hull Avenue, Gainesboro, TN 38562
  • WHO: Representative Rose will be represented by District Director Rebecca Foster during this visit.
  • TIME: 2:30-3:30 pm
  • WHAT: Smith County Local Office Hours
  • LOCATION: Smith County Administration Building, 122 Turner High Circle, Carthage, TN 37030
  • WHO: Representative Rose will be represented by District Director Rebecca Foster during this visit.

Tuesday March 16th

  • TIME: 9:00-10:00 am
  • WHAT: DeKalb County Local Office Hours
  • LOCATION: DeKalb County Board of Education, 110 S Public Square, Smithville, TN 37166
  • WHO: Representative Rose will be represented by Field Representative Lou Nave during this visit.

Wednesday March 24th

  • TIME: 9:00-10:00 am
  • WHAT: Overton County Local Office Hours
  • LOCATION: Overton County Administration Building, 308 West Avenue, Livingston, TN 38570
  • WHO: Representative Rose will be represented by Field Representative Rebecca Foster during this visit.
  • TIME: 11:00-12:00 pm
  • WHAT: Pickett County Local Office Hours
  • LOCATION: Pickett County Library, 79 Pickett Square, Byrdstown, TN 38549
  • WHO: Representative Rose will be represented by District Director Rebecca Foster during this visit.
  • TIME: 2:00-3:00 pm
  • WHAT: Fentress County Local Office Hours
  • LOCATION: Fentress County Courthouse, 101 S. Main Street, Jamestown, TN 38556
  • WHO: Representative Rose will be represented by District Director Rebecca Foster during this visit.

Press Release: Representative John Rose on Celebrating National FFA Week and A Long Legacy of Experiential Learning

by John Rose, U.S. Representative – Tennessee’s Sixth Congressional District

National Future Farmers of America (FFA) Week is a special time for me–an opportunity to reflect on the vital role agriculture has played in my life and the direct impact it has on the success of Tennessee.

One need look no further than the official Great Seal of the State of Tennessee to know that agriculture is entrenched in our state’s legacy and has played an important role in our history. Today, with 66,600 farms covering more than 10.8 million acres, agriculture continues to be Tennessee’s number one industry and remains the economic driver in many communities throughout the Sixth Congressional District.

Since its establishment, FFA has connected students with agriculture professionals providing agriculture-based education in schools across America. The organization teaches students using this motto, “learning to do, doing to learn, earning to live and living to serve.” Many lives, including my own, have been positively impacted by FFA, which cultivates confidence in the classroom and in life. 

Even as an eighth-generation farmer, FFA unquestionably and irrevocably strengthened my passion for agriculture, and in the process, became the most consequential learning experience of my life. The FFA was established in 1928 and granted a Federal Charter in 1950, and today more than 28,000 Tennessee student members are guided by the FFA mission to “make a positive difference in the lives of students by developing their potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education.” The 220 chapters that make up Tennessee FFA represent 93 years of traditions while looking forward to the future. I personally served as the State FFA Vice President and Cookeville FFA President, as well as earned the American FFA Degree.

For nearly an entire year, schools have been closed across the nation, and we are seeing the negative effects of students being isolated from their peers and teachers, including increased mental health issues and a steep decline in academic success. Fortunately, for members of FFA, agricultural education has continued thanks to Supervised Agricultural Experiences (SAE), projects outside of school that apply the knowledge and lessons from the classroom to real life. During my time in FFA, I maintained multiple SAE projects, including raising commercial beef cattle and sheep, growing tobacco crops, owning a small lawncare business, and working on my family’s farm. I believe nothing compares to the contentment of an accomplishment earned and built by your own skill, sweat and bare hands.

Tennessee agriculture plays a vital role in helping to feed our nation, and that incredibly important, ongoing endeavor depends on areas like the counties I represent in Middle Tennessee to successfully cultivate the best and brightest to lead the agriculture industry. FFA plays an integral part in identifying and preparing these future leaders. If you know someone in FFA, you know how passionate these young people are about agriculture as they develop their skills to become agriculturists, biologists, chemists, veterinarians, engineers, entrepreneurs, or any number of careers.

As an FFA alumnus and your voice in Washington, I am proud to be an active and longtime supporter of this organization and advocate to ensure our government works for our farmers, not against. If we want American agriculture to continue to thrive, we must work with our young people to expand agricultural knowledge and leadership skills. Time spent in FFA, in the field, on the farm, in the lab, and in the classroom not only prepares students for successful careers, but imparts basic principles about life and the world in which we live. 

Just one person, taking one step, can bring about change in their community, and FFA prepares students to be those agents of change. From the West Tennessee plains to the mountains of East Tennessee, FFA will continue to lift our state to new heights by carrying on its traditions and values from generation to generation with talent, determination, heart, strength, and dignity. 

February 2021 Meeting of The Smith County Board of Education

The Smith County Board of Education met at 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday, February 23, 2021.

You can watch the full meeting below.

Thanks to Judy Smith and Lacey Crockett of Blackwell Realty for sponsoring the live broadcast of this meeting.

Subscribe to Smith County Insider’s YouTube channel to stay up-to-date on meeting coverage, business spotlights, video features, and more!

The Smith County School Board meets on the third Tuesday of each month at 5:00 p.m. at the Smith County Board of Education, located at 126 Smith County Middle School Lane in Carthage, Tennessee.

The next school board meeting will be held on Tuesday, March 16, 2021.

All meetings are open to the public and streamed live at https://www.facebook.com/smithcountyinsider/.