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November 2022
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4th Annual Grand and Glorious Christmas Show to be held at Pleasant Shade Community Center on December 3, 2022

The 4th Annual Grand & Glorious Christmas Show will be held at the Pleasant Shade Community Center on Saturday, December 3, 2022. The show will start at 2:00 p.m. and will honor and celebrate the Pleasant Shade Volunteer Fire Department. Several local musical guests will be featured.

A $5 donation taken at the door will benefit the Fire Department. There will also be a silent auction and refreshments for sale.

The Pleasant Shade Community Center is located at 743 Pleasant Shade Highway in Pleasant Shade, Tennessee.

Chili Supper at Chapel Hill Church Saturday, November 19th

Chapel Hill Church will host a Chili Supper on Saturday, November 19th from 4-7 p.m. Soup with fixins, dessert and drink will be available for $6. Whole Cakes and homemade ice cream by the gallon will also be for sale. Participants can also enter to win a country ham. Delivery is available in some areas but must be scheduled by Noon on Friday, November 18th. Call the number listed above.

Shop-a-Round Passport Event on Small Business Saturday – November 26th

This Small Business Saturday, November 26, 2022 the Smith County Events Committee and the Chamber of Commerce will Co-Host for a Shop-A-Round Passport Event. The Smith County Chamber of Commerce is sponsoring two cash prizes and the event is FREE to participate in!

How to play:
👉Pick up a passport week of
👉Visit local businesses
👉Learn about them and/or shop with them
👉Get a stamp
👉Complete your passport
👉Turn in at the designated locations!

100% stamped will be entered for $100 cash prize
50% stamped will be entered for a $50 cash prize

Locations for passport pick up and drop off will be posted the Monday before Small Business Saturday.

There will be a table set up somewhere in Carthage on Main Street with goodies and passports as well!! 

For local, small business owners:
To be on the passport you must be a chamber member, but there is no other fee. We are seeking businesses that want to be on the passport and that are willing to host a traveling small business for the day so we can support as many locals as possible! If you want to skip the call to participate just email smithcountyevents@gmail.com with your business name and if you are willing to host a traveling business! 

11th Annual Defeated Creek Youth Deer Hunt December 3rd & 4th

Carthage, TN- The US Army Corps of Engineers, in partnership with the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA), will be hosting the 11th Annual Defeated Creek Youth Deer Management Hunt at the Defeated Creek Recreation Area on December 3rd and 4th 2022.

The hunt will commence Saturday morning and conclude Sunday at noon. This year’s hunt is planned to accommodate 8 permitted hunters and 2 alternates with the goal of improved management of the deer herd populations within the area. There will be 5 rifle permits granted along with 3 archery permits at Defeated Creek Recreation Area. Hunters must be between the ages of 10 and 16 to apply for the hunt and must have completed a TWRA approved hunter safety education class.

All youth hunters must also be accompanied by a mentor 21 years or older who must also be hunter safety certified unless born on or before January 1, 1969. Applications are available at the Cordell Hull Lake Resource Manager’s Office located at 71 Corps Lane Carthage, TN 37030. Applications must be received by 4:00 PM Central Standard Time on Friday November 4th, 2022. For additional information, please contact the Cordell Hull Lake Resource Manager’s Office at 615-735-1034.

To get more information about this events and other programs offered by the US Army Corp of Engineers and Tennessee Wildlife Resource Agency (TWRA) check out their websites.

Veteran’s Celebration Luncheon

Join us this Thursday, November 17th at 12 p.m. at the Smith County Chamber of Commerce for our Veterans’ Celebration Luncheon and November Coalition meeting. We have invited Smith County’s American Legion and we will hear from Lifeliner Colby Lane about the TN Dept of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services Faith Based Initiative. A special lunch will be provided.

2022-23 Gun Hunting Season for Deer Open November 19

Tennessee’s 2022-23 statewide gun hunting season for deer opens Saturday, Nov. 19. The season traditionally opens each year on the Saturday prior to Thanksgiving. During gun season, sportsmen may also use muzzleloaders or archery equipment.

“Deer hunting season is one of our state’s most cherished traditions,” said Jason Maxedon, Executive Director of the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. “We hope everyone will be able to get into the woods and have the opportunity to carry someone with you to continue the tradition.”

The statewide bag limit for antlered bucks is two. No more than one antlered deer may be taken per day, not to exceed two for the season. Hunters are allowed the following antlerless bag limits: Unit L-three per day, Unit A-two per season, Unit B-one per season, Unit C-one per season (Nov. 19-Dec. 4 only), and Unit D-one per season (Nov. 19-25 only).

In Unit CWD, there is a limit of three antlerless deer per day with no season limit. The statewide bag limit for antlered deer is three per season, no more than antlered deer may taken per day, not to exceed three for the season applies in Unit CWD. However, the statewide bag limit of two antlered deer may be exceeded within Unit CWD if taken under the Earn-A-Buck Program or taken under the Replacement Buck Program. Details on each of the programs are on page 31 of the 2022-23 Tennessee Hunting and Trapping Guide.

Anyone born on or after January 1, 1969 is required to carry proof of satisfactory completion of a hunter education class or be in possession of the Apprentice Hunting License (along with other required licenses) while hunting any species in Tennessee. Hunter education can be completed online for free.

For more information about Tennessee’s 2022-23 deer hunting seasons, exact boundaries of deer units, and complete license requirements refer to the 2022-23 Tennessee Hunting and Trapping Guide available online at tnwildlife.org or the TWRA App. Physical copies can be picked up at an agency office or license agent retail location.

Second Harvest Mobile Food Truck Friday, November 18

The Second Harvest Food Truck will be at the Smith County Agriculture Center on Friday, November 18th. The truck generally arrives approximately 8 a.m. Volunteers work to unload the truck and get the food ready for pick-up shortly after. Food is distributed until it is gone. Cars line up around the Ag Center early. Those hoping to receive food at this distribution are encouraged to be in line no later than 10 a.m.

The food trucks are sponsored by the Hunger Relief Fund of Smith County and grants from Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle TN. Churches, businesses and individuals donate to the hunger relief fund all year. Generally two dates are scheduled each month. For more information feel free to contact the Smith County Chamber of Commerce 615-735-2093.

Cultivating Communities by UT Extension – Rutherford County

UT Extension Smith County is proud to present the latest episode of Cultivating Communities. Join hosts Katie Martin and Chris Hicks as they travel the Upper Cumberland and beyond to introduce you to local farmers, families, and Extension agents.

In this episode of Cultivating Communities, Chris and Katie head to Rutherford County to talk to two producers who are dealing with the challenges of farming in an urban area, while also using the population boom in one of Tennessee’s fastest-growing counties to their advantage.

The day begins as Agriculture Extension Agents Mitchell Mote and Rebekah Norman give Chris and Katie an overview of UT Extension programs and the ever-changing agricultural landscape in Rutherford County.

After that, the agents pay a visit to Batey Farms, a Tennessee Century Farm that was established in 1807. Brandon Whitt describes how their farming operation has changed over the years, from livestock to row crops to agritourism, continuously innovating in order to survive and keep the farm intact and profitable for the next generation.

Next, Mitchell, Rebekah, Chris, and Katie meet up with Ray Radford, a farmer who raises Corriente cattle right in the heart of Smyrna. Ray has tapped into the ethnic diversity of Rutherford County to successfully market his cattle and grow his on-farm harvesting business.

You can watch past and future episodes of Cultivating Communities with UT Extension on the UT Extension Smith County Facebook page and YouTube channel. Episodes also air on DTC3 TV.

Cultivating Communities is produced by Katie Martin and Chris Hicks and edited by Rachel Petty. Production assistance provided by DTC3TV.

UT Extension provides Real.Life.Soultions. throughout Tennessee. With an office in each of the state’s ninety-five counties, UT Extension helps Tennesseans improve their quality of life and solve problems by applying research and evidence-based knowledge about agriculture and natural resources, family and consumer sciences, 4-H youth development, and community development. Learn more about UT Extension Smith County at https://smith.tennessee.edu.

Farmers encouraged to keep the stubble during no-till November

The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is encouraging Tennessee farmers to keep the tillage equipment in the machine shed during No-Till November.

  • First launched in 2017, the NRCS project is a conservation twist on the national cancer awareness No-Shave November campaign that encourages people not to shave during the entire month. 
  • The NRCS campaign encourages farmers to “keep the stubble” on their harvested crops fields and give their farm a more rugged, natural look. The campaign has reached more than two million people nationally through Twitter and local media since 2017.
  • Leave the tillage equipment parked in the shed this fall. Consider the benefits of no till, which is a way of growing crops or pasture from year to year with minimal soil disturbance.
  • Soil is like the skin of the farm: it’s a nourishing barrier for what grows above and beneath. But whereas a shaving razor stops at the surface of the skin, tillage rips into the soil and can inflict harm.
  • No till improves soil health by not disturbing soil microbiology. Beneficial soil microbes are essential for growing food, fiber and fuel.
  • Repeated tillage undermines soil structure and reduces aggregate stability; it breaks down organic matter and releases carbon stored in the soil.
  • No till is a key climate-smart farming practice, helping healthy soil store more carbon sequestered from the atmosphere to mitigate climate change.
  • No till improves the soil’s water holding capacity and keeps soils in place, preventing harmful runoff and erosion.
  • Still not convinced to #keepthestubble? No till saves time, money (fuel) and wear on equipment. It’s an economically-sound choice.

Please visit the new NRCS Tennessee website here for more information about soil health, no till, and other conservation concerns.

USDA touches the lives of all Americans each day in so many positive ways. In the Biden-Harris administration, USDA is transforming America’s food system with a greater focus on more resilient local and regional food production, fairer markets for all producers, ensuring access to healthy and nutritious food in all communities, building new markets and streams of income for farmers and producers using climate smart food and forestry practices, making historic investments in infrastructure and clean energy capabilities in rural America, and committing to equity across the department by removing systemic barriers and building a workforce more representative of America. To learn more, visit usda.gov.  

USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer and lender.

Food for Thought: Flu Risks

After nearly three years of restrictions related to the COVID-19 pandemic stifled flu cases across the nation, University of Tennessee Extension health experts are warning Tennesseans that this year may be different.

“Flu season is expected to be more severe this year as we are already seeing cases of other respiratory viruses on the rise,” says Soghra Jarvandi, a UT Extension Community Health Specialist and Associate Professor. “As more and more COVID-19 pandemic precautions are relaxed, such as masking and limiting indoor gatherings, more and more people will come in contact with the flu virus.”

Jarvandi adds that fewer people both got sick with the flu and were hospitalized with severe illness during the last few years as a result of the precautions and lockdowns associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. These precautions decreased the number of people getting sick with COVID-19 but also lowered risk of exposure for other respiratory diseases like flu or RSV.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an average of 32 million Americans got sick with the flu from 2012-2020, including an average of 36,000 deaths from severe illness each year.

While anyone can become infected with the flu virus, some populations are at a higher risk of complications. Children younger than 5 years old, adults 65 and over, adults with chronic conditions, pregnant women, people with disabilities, people with HIV/AIDS, and people who have cancer are all at an elevated risk of severe illness.

Year after year, one of the easiest ways to protect yourself and others from flu is to get a flu vaccine at a nearby pharmacy. “Anyone six months of age or older should get an annual flu vaccine, with rare exception. Vaccination is especially important for people who are at high risk for serious complications from the flu,” adds Jarvandi.

Other steps of flu prevention include wearing a mask or isolating while you’re sick, washing your hands frequently, and maintaining a healthy lifestyle that includes nutritious foods like fruits and vegetables, adequate nightly sleep, and regular exercise.

More information about seasonal flu is available in the UT Extension publication FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT SEASONAL FLU D 182. Visit utextension.tennessee.edu and click on the publications tab to search.

French Coconut Pie

1 1/3 cup sugar

2 eggs

1/2 cup evaporated milk

1/4 cup butter

1 teaspoon vanilla

1 1/3 cup coconut

Melt butter and let cool. Add eggs, sugar, and other ingredients. Mix with mixer. Pour into an unbaked pie shell and bake at 425 degrees for 10 minutes. Then, bake at 350 degrees until golden brown and doesn’t shake when oven rack is moved, about 25-30 minutes. Submitted by Benita Lane, Carthage FCE Club.

Upper Cumberland Game Con at the Smith County Ag Center on November 19, 2022

Are you ready Smith County? For the first ever of it’s kind within our county lines – drum roll- Upper Cumberland Game Con! What is this, you may ask? UCGC is a unique gathering space for gamers of all kinds. You like, RPGs? Awesome, they’ve got tons for you! Are you a board gamer? Sweet, there’s plenty for you, too! Everything from Trading Card Games (TCG) to Live-action Role Playing (LARP,) there’s something for just about everyone. Let’s dig in to find out more about the who, what, when, where, and why of it all.

Who? Local game store owner, Stephanie Winfree, of The Rogue and Raven has spearheaded the entirety of Upper Cumberland Game Con. She started with an idea, found a space, brought in vendors, and now it’s up to you all to bring in the crowds.

What is going to be at this con, you’re wondering? Laughs in gamer It’s going to be a fun-filled and action-packed day. For those of you who love TCGs or are interested in learning they will have Magic: The Gathering and Pokémon tournaments. Or maybe you are looking for a more immersive experience? Find yourself at a table for Warhammer, a D&D homebrew one shot, Dungeon Crawl Classics, or Call of Cthulhu. If you’re new to D&D or needing a refresher, there will also be a character building session!

So, let’s say RPGs don’t quite fit your fancy and you need to be all-in, talk the talk and walk the walk, possibly even wear the wares? They’ve got you covered with an entire LARP area! The LARP arena will open at 10am for training following with actual battle rounds starting at 4pm and lasting through the duration of the con.

If you’re looking for a more laid back experience, there will be tables for casual play, a plethora of board games to play hosted by Music City Geeks, face painting and temporary tattoos by a local artist and, we can’t forget to mention the food trucks and many splendored vendors. These vendors are showing up and showing out with all kinds of goodies from K-Pop, accessories and trinkets, games, collectibles, books and more!

When and where will this fascinating event be taking place? Mark your calendars for November 19th, 2022, starting at 10am (9:30 for VIP attendees) lasting through midnight at the Smith County Ag Center. For more detailed information, tickets, and to pre-register for events, go to TheRogueAndRaven.com/GameCon.

Bring the whole family, there will be yard games for the kiddos! Dive into a new hobby or pick up an old one. Find gifts for the upcoming holidays. Treat yourself! There’s a whole new world to experience at Upper Cumberland Game Con. (written by Jess Knowles)

2022-23 Gun Hunting Season for Deer Opens November 19th

Tennessee’s 2022-23 statewide gun hunting season for deer opens Saturday, Nov. 19. The season traditionally opens each year on the Saturday prior to Thanksgiving. During gun season, sportsmen may also use muzzleloaders or archery equipment.  

“Deer hunting season is one of our state’s most cherished traditions,” said Jason Maxedon, Executive Director of the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. “We hope everyone will be able to get into the woods and have the opportunity to carry someone with you to continue the tradition.”

The statewide bag limit for antlered bucks is two. No more than one antlered deer may be taken per day. Hunters are allowed the following antlerless bag limits: Unit L-three per day, Unit A-two per season, Unit B-one per season, Unit C-one per season (Nov. 19-Dec. 4 only), and Unit D-one per season (Nov. 19-25 only).

In Unit CWD, there is a limit of three antlerless deer per day with no season limit. The statewide bag limit of two antlered deer applies in Unit CWD. However, the statewide bag limit of two antlered deer may be exceeded within Unit CWD if taken under the Earn-A-Buck Program or taken under the Replacement Buck Program. Details on each of the programs are on page 31 of the 2022-23 Tennessee Hunting and Trapping Guide.

Anyone born on or after January 1, 1969 is required to carry proof of satisfactory completion of a hunter education class or be in possession of the Apprentice Hunting License (along with other required licenses) while hunting any species in Tennessee. Hunter education can be completed online for free.

For more information about Tennessee’s 2022-23 deer hunting seasons, exact boundaries of deer units, and complete license requirements refer to the 2022-23 Tennessee Hunting and Trapping Guide available online at tnwildlife.org or the TWRA App. Physical copies can be picked up at an agency office or license agent retail location.

Over 4,000 people flooded the streets of Gordonsville at the 5th Annual Halloween Bash

Record crowds flooded the streets of Gordonsville on October 31 to attend the annual Gordonsville Halloween Bash. This is the 5th year that the Gordonsville Events Committee has organized the event and it has grown tremendously each year.

Nearly 50 businesses, churches, and organizations setup booths to hand out candy to all of the trick-or-treaters. The event also had a photo booth, music, dancing, door prizes, a $250 cash giveaway, TONS of candy and much more! Domino’s Pizza and Helen’s Restaurant setup at this year’s bash and served freshly cooked pizza, fish, chicken, fried oreos and more. Southern Shave & Brew Co. was also in attendance serving a variety of shakes, frappes, and sno cones.

A new addition to the 2022 Gordonsville Halloween Bash was a shuttle but service. Two 13 passenger shuttle buses ran non-stop throughout the evening to give attendees the ability to not have to worry about finding a parking spot near Main Street. It is estimated that over 600 people utilized the shuttle bus service. The Gordonsville Events Committee plans to add additional buses and parking lots next year.

If your business, organization, or church is interested participating in the event next year, please send an email to GordonsvilleHalloweenBash@gmail.com. The Gordonsville Events Committee is also inviting individuals or families to come to the event and hand out candy.